“Love on the Tarmac” Snippet #2

Hey everybody.

Once again it’s Rainbow Snippets time.

Today’s offering is also from Love on the Tarmac, which was published by Dreamspinner Press in their Bare Studs anthology last year. This is a story about a guy who works on the ramp of a small airline and falls in love. This snippet picks up immediately from last week. (Apologies for the one bad word included in the original text.)

 

Flight 229 from Missoula Montana to Yakima Washington was home.

As soon as the noise died down, I took off my earmuffs and hung them from my belt, my smile as wide as the sun.

God, I loved life on the tarmac.

“Hey, Rampie. Get a move on.”

At least I did until that asshole opened his big mouth.

 

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“Love on the Tarmac” Snippet #1

Hey everybody.

Once again it’s Rainbow Snippets time.

Sorry I skipped last week. Real life got in the way. I’m making it up to you by sharing something new, a snippet from a totally different story called Love on the Tarmac, which was published by Dreamspinner Press in their Bare Studs anthology last year.

This is a story about how a guy who works on the ramp of a small airline falls in love. Here’s how it starts:

 A wicked wind slapped against my face as the prop wash blew across the tarmac. A roar of two PW100 turbocharged engines accompanied the breeze. The noise pounded in my head, but my acoustic earmuffs cut the sound to a manageable level. With a plastic wand in each hand, I moved my arms in and out, all while walking backward. My way of enticing the 34,000 pound Bombardier Q400 to creep closer. Once the front wheels of the plane rolled over the X on the blacktop, I crossed my arms over my head to tell the pilot to stop, then moved one wand across my throat. He cut the engines, and the furious spin of the propeller blades started to slow.

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The Game of Life: Choose Your Spouse

So I’ve been playing electronic versions of The Game of Life since my PS1 days when it came on a disk. Since then I’ve bought a new version of the game to go with every new console/computer/PDA/tablet/smart phone I’ve owned.

And while the game is basically the same, each version is a little different. In one, the car would travel through the decades as it drove around the board with music and vehicle styles progressing from the 50s to the 90s during the journey. Another rendition let you buy stocks and pay off your loans, while another let you sue your neighbor. The latter arrived in a more recent incarceration.

But one aspect of the game remained the same, no matter what edition you played. When you got to the chapel, your spouse appeared automatically. If you were playing with a blue peg (aka a man) a pink peg came out of the church. If you had chosen a pink peg, you could depend on a blue companion to join you in your car.

So when I saw a 2016 version of the game available, I expected no different. I dithered about buying it. The last variation was still on my phone and it worked perfectly fine. But the new game promised better graphics and new features, so I figured what the heck. I could spare the $2.99.

So, I clicked download and started playing. Yes the graphics were pretty and my player rode a motorcycle instead of the traditional car, but when I got to the animated church, my jaw dropped.

It asked me to CHOOSE MY SPOUSE! That’s right, players are now allowed to choose a blue or pink peg to marry, even if the color matches their own! Gay or straight, now all are welcome inside the game.

As I traveled across the board I thought about how far we’ve come. Sure, the country is a mess in certain ways, but if two pegs of the same color can travel through the game of life together, then there’s hope out there for us all.

 

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“Murder Most Yowl” Snippet #10

Hey everybody.

Once again it’s Rainbow Snippets time.

Today’s snippet is from my novel Murder Most Yowl which is now available.

This scene picks up immediately after last week’s snippet, as Cam recalls a traumatic moment from his past.

 

I didn’t tell her how scared Trent Crowe looked perched on the edge of that rooftop. How my chest heaved, gasping for air to replace what I’d lost chasing him up there. The look on his face as he fell backward, disappearing from view. The sound his body made when it slammed onto a car one hundred feet below. I didn’t tell Crowe’s mother any of that, but I remembered. I would always remember.

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